Dutch Egg Liqueur and Whipped Cream Cake

Dutch Egg Liqueur and Whipped Cream Cake | A Dutchie Baking

Happy Easter to one and all! For this year’s celebration I made an extra special (boozy) cake with Dutch egg liqueur (because you can’t have enough egg related things on Easter right?). The Dutch name for this liqueur is advocaat, which can also be translated to lawyer, but doesn’t have anything to do with this profession! Made with egg yolks, brandy and sugar, it’s rich, creamy and has a custard-like flavor. It’s also a Dutch grandmother’s favorite. You can find a recipe to make the liqueur yourself here or you can purchase it on this website.

Dutch Egg Liqueur and Whipped Cream Cake | A Dutchie Baking

Advocaat is usually eaten pure, with a dollop of whipped cream on top. I can remember countless birthdays where my grandmother and my aunties would eat it like there was no tomorrow. And yes, they did get tipsy! I guess it’s our version of eggnog.

 

Dutch Egg Liqueur and Whipped Cream Cake | A Dutchie Baking

Advocaat can be compared to Mexican Rompope and Polish Ajerkoniak although the latter is based on vodka. I have actually made advocaat with a variety of liquors, such as gin, rum and brandy (brandy is traditional). To be honest, as there is so much alcohol in them, I don’t really taste much difference, I’m not a liquor connoisseur!

Dutch Egg Liqueur and Whipped Cream Cake | A Dutchie Baking

This cake, then, is a take on the traditional advocaat-with-dollop-of-whipped-cream that is etched into my memory. It’s NOT suitable for anyone under the legal drinking age but you won’t get tipsy or drunk eating just one slice. If you eat the whole thing, that might be another story, but I wouldn’t particularly recommend doing that 😉

Dutch Egg Liqueur and Whipped Cream Cake | A Dutchie Baking

For a variation, you could swap the chocolate shavings out for chopped (hazel)nuts. I have also seen advocaat cakes where the sponge is sprinkled with some coffee – sounds delicious! And of course, this cake can be served on occasions other than Easter as well! Enjoy!

Dutch Egg Liqueur and Whipped Cream Cake | A Dutchie Baking

 

Dutch Egg Liqueur and Whipped Cream Cake Recipe

Tools: 24cm springform tin lined with baking parchment, piping bag with star (1M) nozzle, large palette knife

Serves: at least 12!

Ingredients:

Sponge:

175 grams egg white
175 grams egg yolk (about 9 large eggs)
175 grams caster sugar
1 tablespoon vanilla extract
140 grams plain flour
35 cornstarch

Filling/topping:

1 liter of whipping cream
5 tablespoons caster sugar
32 grams whipped cream stabilizer
250 grams Dutch egg liqueur (advocaat)
100 grams chocolate shavings
chocolate Easter eggs

  1. Preheat the oven to 180C/355F. Line the bottom of the cake tin with baking parchment, grease the sides of the tin.
  2. To make the sponge, prepare a stainless steel or glass bowl and the whisk attachment(s) by rubbing it down with lemon juice or vinegar. This is to remove any remnants of grease. Then start whisking the egg whites at high speed. When the whites start to foam, add the sugar a tablespoon at a time. Whisk until stiff peaks form. Then turn down to medium-low speed and add the vanilla extract. Whisk for another 2 minutes. Turn the mixer off and fold the egg yolks into the mixture. Don’t over stir! In a separate bowl, combine flour and cornstarch. Sift into the egg mixture and fold in. Again, be careful not to overmix. Pour into the prepared cake tin. If you see any clusters of flour while pouring, lightly stir them in with a fork. Bake for 30-35 minutes or until a skewer inserted in the middle comes out clean (start checking at 25 minutes to be safe). When baked, immediately release from the tin and leave to stand on a wire rack with the baking parchment still on the bottom. Divide the cake in three parts horizontally.
  3. For the filling, whip up the whipping cream with the sugar and stabilizer. Divide in half and fold 80 grams of egg liqueur into one half. To assemble, first spread a thin layer of liqueur on the first cake layer, then spread half of the advocaat/cream mixture on top. Do the same for the second layer. Then cover the whole cake with the regular whipped cream using the palette knife. Fill a piping bag with a star nozzle with the remaining cream and pipe rosettes on top. Drizzle the remaining liqueur in the middle. Cover the sides of the cake with the chocolate shavings and sprinkle some on top. Top alternating rosettes with chocolate Easter eggs and you’re all set!

 

Dutch Breakfast Cake (Ontbijtkoek)

Dutch Breakfast Cake (Ontbijtkoek) | A Dutchie Baking

I did a small survey on my blog’s Facebook page asking what kind of bakes/recipes people would like to see on the blog and Dutch breakfast cake was a clear winner! It turns out there are a LOT of recipes available, some with rye, some with buckwheat or wheat or even spelt flour. The most genuine version of this cake is made with whole rye flour so I chose a recipe using only that. It might look weird using whole rye flour in a cake, but trust me, it works!Dutch Breakfast Cake (Ontbijtkoek) | A Dutchie Baking

Dutch breakfast cake is basically a heavier kind of ginger cake, which you can add dried fruits, stem ginger, sugar or nuts to. Our supermarket shelves are filled with many varieties, even sugar-free cakes using xylitol. The cake is eaten with breakfast of course, but is also a beloved afternoon snack with a cup of coffee, slathered in (real) butter.

Dutch Breakfast Cake (Ontbijtkoek) | A Dutchie Baking

I used speculaas spices in this cake but if you want, you can substitute them for mixed spice, or mix up another “koek” spices recipe. I like my breakfast cake with stem ginger as I can get a little nauseous in the morning, but of course you can mix in whatever addition you like! Pearl sugar sprinkled on top is a must in my opinion, as the cake itself is not very sweet, and I have a bit of a sweet tooth! I hope you’ll enjoy this Dutch breakfast staple as much as I do!Dutch Breakfast Cake (Ontbijtkoek) | A Dutchie Baking

Recipe Dutch Breakfast Cake

Source: Gezond leven van Jacoline, adapted by Handmade Helen

Tools: whisk, 30x12cm loaf tin (greased and lined with baking parchment)

Ingredients:

200 ml full-fat milk
1 egg
100 grams (liquid) honey
90 grams apple butter
250 grams whole rye flour
2 teaspoons baking soda
pinch of salt
2 tablespoons speculaas spices 

50 grams stem ginger, chopped (optional)
pearl sugar (optional)

  1. Preheat the oven to 160C/320F.
  2. In a large bowl, whisk together (by hand) milk, egg, honey and apple butter. Mix flour, baking soda, salt and spices in a separate bowl and add to the wet ingredients in increments, making sure to whisk well after each addition. Mix the stem ginger in with the last increment of flour.
  3. Pour batter into the tin. Sprinkle pearl sugar on top (optional). Bake for about 60 minutes or until a skewer inserted in the middle comes out clean.
  4. Take cake out of the tin immediately after baking and place on a wire rack to cool completely. The cake tastes even better 2 or 3 days after baking! Best served slathered with butter.

Mini Christmas Stollen

Mini Christmas Stollen |  A Dutchie Baking

A Merry Christmas to you all! If you have loads of nuts and dried fruits left from making your fruit cakes and Christmas puddings, use them to make these mini stollen! I say mini, they’re not thát small actually but perfect to serve for Christmas breakfast. I like cutting them into smaller slices and slathering them with soft, real butter – ultimate decadence <3

Mini Christmas Stollen |  A Dutchie Baking

I’ve used up whatever I could find in my cupboard as filling in these stollen but feel free to make you own, unique filling with dried fruits, nuts, or even pearl sugar. Whatever the filling, you must sprinkle on copious amounts of icing sugar!

Mini Christmas Stollen |  A Dutchie Baking

Mini Christmas Stollen Recipe

Makes 8 small stollen

Source: base recipe from Uit de Keuken van Arden

Ingredients:

Dough:

375 grams strong white bread flour
10 grams instant yeast
50 grams sugar
160 ml lukewarm full-fat milk
1 egg
1/2 teaspoon speculaas spices or mixed spice
7 grams salt
75 grams soft unsalted butter, diced

Filling 1:

75 grams chopped dried apricots
100 grams golden raisins
125 grams currants
50 grams chopped almonds
25 grams chopped hazelnuts

Filling 2:

250 grams almond paste
zest of 1/2 orange
16 amarena cherries

1/2 – 1 cup of icing sugar

  1. Steep the dried fruits in some hot water (optionally with some orange liqueur or rum) for 15 minutes, then leave to dry overnight in a sieve.
  2. To make the dough, mix all the ingredients EXCEPT for the butter in a large bowl, making sure the yeast and salt aren’t touching each other directly. Knead for about 7 minutes in a free-standing electric mixer. Then add the butter a little bit at a time until all of it has been incorporated. Shape into a ball and leave for 15 minutes. Then knead in filling 1, by hand or with the mixer. Shape into a ball again and leave to proof for 1 hour.
  3. For filling 2, mix the almond paste with the orange zest. Half the amarena cherries.
  4. Divide the proofed dough into 8 pieces. Shape each piece into an oval shape with your hands. Divide the almond paste into 8 pieces and roll each piece to the same length as the wide side of the oval. Place it on the dough, then place 4 amarena cherry halves on top. Fold the dough over. Place on a baking sheet lined with baking parchment. Proof for another 45 minutes.
  5. Preheat the oven to 200C/390F.
  6. Once proofed, bake the mini stollen for 30-35 minutes. Leave them to cool on a wire rack. Once cooled, cover with plenty of icing sugar. Enjoy with some butter slathered on!

 

Salted Peanut and Chocolate Cookies – 12 Days of Christmas Cookies #9

Salted Peanut and Chocolate Cookies | A Dutchie Baking

I know, I know, I’m late with this recipe! But, I got caught up in Christmas business and some anxiety attacks so I’m sure you’ll understand 🙂 This cookie uses the same dough as the previous recipe  but features a different filling: dark chocolate and salted peanuts – mmm.

Salted Peanut and Chocolate Cookies | A Dutchie Baking

Using one dough with several fillings is perfect for Christmas of course – you can serve loads of flavors so that everyone can find something they like. I like using salted peanuts in combination with chocolate because the salt brings out the chocolatey flavor. You can use the same principle for hot chocolate by adding a pinch of salt, trust me, it will change you chocolate life!

Salted Peanut and Chocolate Cookies | A Dutchie Baking

These cookies are also great to serve with some (vanilla or chocolate) ice cream, or even to make mini ice cream sandwiches with for a cute and easy Christmas dinner dessert!

Salted Peanut and Chocolate Cookies | A Dutchie Baking

Salted Peanut and  Chocolate Cookies Recipe

For 40 cookies

Ingredients:

175 grams plain flour
1/2 tsp baking powder
50 grams sugar
100 grams softened unsalted butter
1/2 egg

60 grams salted peanuts, chopped
50 grams chopped dark chocolate

  1. Sift flour and baking powder together. Add sugar, butter, and the egg. Knead by hand or in a freestanding mixer with paddle attachment.
  2. Add peanuts and chocolate and knead until incorporated (not too long). Shape dough into 2 20cm rolls and wrap in clingfilm. Chill for at least 1 hours.
  3. Preheat the oven to 180C/355F. Line two baking trays with baking parchment or Silpat mats.
  4. Cut the dough rolls into 1 cm thick slices and place the cookies on the baking trays. Bake for 10-12 minutes. In an airtight box, these cookies will keep for up to 3 weeks.

 

Coconut Pistachio Cookies with Orange – 12 Days of Christmas Cookies #8

Coconut Pistachio Cookies with Orange | A Dutchie Baking

It isn’t properly Christmas until you’ve baked Christmas cookies right? Well, I thought I’d add to my 12 days of Christmas Cookies series today with a slightly exotic variety! You can add all sorts of ingredients to this cookie dough, so feel free to experiment! Baking time stays the same. Tomorrow I’ll post a peanut and chocolate variety so look out for that.

Coconut Pistachio Cookies with Orange | A Dutchie BakingCoconut Pistachio Cookies with Orange | A Dutchie Baking

A few tips: you can use orange juice as a substitution for the orange liqueur, although I prefer using Cointreau. If you want, you can keep some of the grated coconut aside to sprinkle on top before baking. These cookies will keep for up to 3 weeks in an airtight container!

Coconut Pistachio Cookies with Orange | A Dutchie Baking

Pistachio, Coconut and Orange Cookie Recipe

Source: based on a Dr Oetker recipe

For 40 cookies

Ingredients:

175 grams plain flour
1/2 tsp baking powder
50 grams sugar
100 grams softened unsalted butter
1/2 egg

60 grams grated coconut
2 tbsp orange liqueur
zest of 1 orange
50 grams chopped pistachios

  1. Sift flour and baking powder together. Add sugar, butter, and the egg. Knead by hand or in a freestanding mixer with paddle attachment.
  2. Add grated coconut, liqueur, zest, and pistachios and knead until incorporated (not too long). Shape dough into 2 20cm rolls and wrap in clingfilm. Chill for at least 1 hours.
  3. Preheat the oven to 180C/355F. Line two baking trays with baking parchment or Silpat mats.
  4. Cut the dough rolls into 1 cm thick slices and place the cookies on the baking trays. Bake for 10-12 minutes. In an airtight box, these cookies will keep for up to 3 weeks.